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right. pull out, everybody. i'll let you watch. >> mississippi. 7 mississippi. fail. >> and in fact, the car flips over. >> oh, my gosh. >> can you believe this? the dash camera catches everything. rolls over on its side. and flips. apparently the translation in korean is great. roll it again. we'll just have some fun. but apparently the driving instructor says "brake, brake, brake!" [ bleep ], what do we do? what do we do? as the car starts turning over on its side. right about here. okay. >> oh, oh, oh. >> he says, what are you doing, don't know which gas pedal you are pressing! i'm going crazy! get out of this car! >> i could have done the translation from what she was doing. you can hear her go oh, oh, oh, oh. >> it sounds the same in any language, the expletive. doesn't it? >> oh, oh, oh. >> failed in seven seconds. worst driver ever! >> and over again. >>> here is a video you are going to want to watch. this one is great. group of young youtubers, true story asa team have posted a video of themselves, they usually -- they're pranksters. this time they changed up the tone. this
? guest: it is certainly a valid point. host: let's try charles from mississippi. republican line. hi, there. caller: my question to the lady would be that i noticed during this family vacation with the president's family was gone to martha's vineyard, they left bo the dog at home, and sent a marine helicopter to bring it back at a cost of over $300,000. i would like to know why that is not talked about more. host: more about the president there. guest: i do not know where the facts are coming from, but i find that intriguing, and if that is true, that is certainly something reuters would want to know about and write about. i have a long record in journalism looking into the -- exactly that kind of thing. i will take that note home with me. host: a couple of callers are mentioning the white house, and twitter, the same thing. we have been talking about rules congress wrote for itself for travel. you have a sense of how the white house works in this area -- how he decides where they are going? is anyone oversee those decisions because we are hearing it from callers? guest: i do not kno
the opportunity to stand on the deck of a new bridge over the mississippi river, 16 feet board to go. i could watch this go down the nations greatest river. theas an awesome view. people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. obeying hiss is ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. great examplet that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. thosek forward to engagements. it is an opportunity for me to engage with governors. have traveled around the country, seeing
lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s, you know, who lived there? well, as i was driving, you looked closer, there was puffs of smoke coming from the roof. it was not someone who lived there. someone was still living here in the year 2002, 2003. one day, myself and matt black, a photographer who, you know, is kind of a modern day dorothy lang, evans, we pulledded off the side of the road, came over the railroad tracks across this little dirt road here, across from this vineyard, and we pulled up to the shack. it was in better shape then, but a tarp paper shack, and as we walked up, there were rabbit furs that had been -- that were hammered on to the wall. i remember knocking once, twice, and this place was on stilts. the door creeked open, and there stood this black man who looked like he'd been lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s. he had a stutter. in fact, later he told us that he came west with a stutter, one state at a time. his name was james dixon, 95, he was living here and had since the 40s. he was part of the migration of blacks who did something that no blacks in ameri
. , james is ini ocean springs, and he supports same-sex marriage. >> yes, and mississippi, of .ourse, does not recognize i am originally from louisiana, and it is not recognized. but just like all other civil progress, the south as far behind. it will take some time to reach it, but we will eventually get there. lived inng have you mississippi? >> just over a year. of the time i spent in louisiana and i lived in baileys, central america, for the last five years before e,ming to mississippi -- beliz central america, for the last five years before coming to mississippi. >> mark, go ahead with your comment. thismain point to all of is, we live in a great country and everybody has the right to be wrong. everybody has the right to be right. what we have here is a battle over semantics, i think. can be think the union called marriage because marriage is a sacrament. it is sacred. it is holy. , a homosexual marriage, is sodomy. that is not holy. that is an unholy union. if you want to go ahead and have the government take care of all of your finances and everything after you die, then call it som
first discovered the following places: florida, the pacific ocean and the mississippi river? do those come to the top -- would you know, jon? jon: two of those, i know. jenna: oh, please. jon, of course. if you're like the rest of us -- [laughter] don't feel bad if you're stumped without using the internet. so were we, quite frankly, and to make it worse, these questions are from a test administered to kentucky schools in 1912 to eighth graders. eighth graders. david strange is the executive director of the bullet county history museum located in shepherdsville, kentucky, and the only thing that made me feel sort of okay is knowing that you, the smart guy at the museum, also had to turn to the internet -- [laughter] to find out some of these answers. how difficult was it? >> well, i remember, i actually remember most all of these questions or similar to them being taught and asked when i was in high school -- jenna: oh, come on, you weren't around in 1912, david, please. [laughter] >> no, but when i was in high school, in the '60s and '70s, i remember being taught them. now, rememberi
in meridian, mississippi in an integrated school. and went to school at university of alabama at a very integrated campus and at a campus that in the 1980s was actually handling racial issues a lot better than a lot of campuses across the northeast. but martin luther king not only did for america but what he did for his home region of the south, a region that had been scarred by racism and racial tensions for years. to see how quickly things -- he gave this speech the year i was born in a segregated south and segregated america. by the time i started first grade in meridian mississippi it w was integrated. that is nothing short of extraordinary and that is a legacy that we put first at the feet of martin luther king and also all the civil rights workers and protesters and leaders who gave their all to make sure that white children like myself and black children who were my friends, who i played football with in first grade and baseball with in first grade, would go to school together. that was the normal. that was normal for me. let me -- al, let me go to you quickly here. it is incredi
trying, sir, to talk some sense over this proposed government shutdown. mississippi governor phil bryant tells "the new york times," and i'm quoting, we believe in eliminating obama care completely but at some point, perhaps we have to realize that the federal government because of the support of our military, support of our public safety, our infrastructure, wiig have to have a budget." but will senator cruz and his cohort listen? >> well, i don't think we know that yet. look, john mccain is saying the same thing. tom cole who is very conservative who is in the house leadership is saying the same thing. it would be a disaster for the republicans to shut down the government. they did it in 1995. those guys were there. they saw that it was a political train wreck. i think boehner understands this, the house speaker. i think mcconnell understands this, but boehner wants to be called speaker, not ex-speaker. mcconnell faces a primary in kentucky. so i don't think that we can be certain about what's going to happen here. if they do shut down the government and they'll be blamed for it, if th
on the show, it's no longer them, it's us. you know, i had a farmer from the delta of mississippi. he said i want to identify myself. i'm a white listener. i'm a farmer, and i'm here to tell you we are so upset with the republicans for what they're doing, trying to tie the food stamp into the farm bill. you had bennie thompson, who said as many of the members of the caucus said for the first time in 20 years, they had to vote against the farm bill. people are seeing that these individuals are going against the best interests of their own party. >> there is no doubt about it. i'm going have to leave it there. >> yeah. adults will speak up, al. >> nia-malika henderson and joe madison, thank you for your time tonight. >> thank you. >> thank you, rev. >>> coming up, the gop's newest plan to go after hillary clinton. we've seen this scary movie. [ male announcer ] running out of steam? ♪ now you can give yourself a kick in the rear! v8 v-fusion plus energy. natural energy from green tea plus fruits and veggies. need a little kick? ooh! could've had a v8. in the juice aisle. >>> the gop takes th
. but across the states of florida, alabama, mississippi, louisiana, and texas, maybe not. >> we're going to stop you for not having a gun. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: there you go. exactly. yeah, i guess that's -- you know, that's a state by state issue, chris. >> it is. >> stephanie: killed an unarmed teenager -- all right. okay. daryle in mobile -- >> caller: [ inaudible ] mobile, stephfy. >> stephanie: hi daryle go ahead. >> caller: i was doing 80 and a black guy got ahead of me speeding, and i got pulled over, and i had my police t-shirt on, and i had my weapon on my side. he said okay. i need your license and registration. but he did give me a ticket. >> stephanie: yikes. yeah, interesting. interesting. i guess you are not quite as awesome as george zimmerman. >> caller: i guess not. when i seen that on the news. i said, wow, what a break. >> stephanie: yeah, you are not quite as white looking as george zimmerman. maybe that's what it is. >> wow. >> stephanie: just yet another incredible story, how about incredible that awesome -- >> he's so awesome. >> stephanie: right. he is just g
on a de deadly plane crash that happened in alabama. the ups cargo jet went down in mississippi. look at these pictures. huge ball of fire at that scene this morning. it was about a half a mile short of the runway at birmingham international airport. sadly, the pilot and co-pilot were both lost, both fatalities in this terrific histororrific accident. we heard witnesses describing the scene. >> i got out from bed and went to look in the window in the back and a minute later saw a big flash in the air. in the sky. i saw, i heard big big big explosion, big one. it was the crash of the aircraft. >> amazingly no homes on the ground were damaged. much more on this story coming up. >>> jesse jackson senior is speaking about his son's two year sentence he just received for misusing election money. let's listen to what he had to say. >> i had to raise many questions to myself about did i confuse success with sickness. jesse's been driven to succeed, to be effective. remember, we got the water tank built out in fort heights, whatout was, arguing for the airport, something like that. i did not
, mississippi, marie, democratic caller in mississippi. the future of the democratic arty at this point, hiller -- hillary clinton is the sole standing. who she will take with her, that is questionable. she does not have much of a selection to choose from. after listening to her speech at the bar, it just reminded everyone how skilled she is. she is a lawyer. she understands constitutional law in this country as well as the national law. she's the best qualified in able to skills of being negotiate. it is the travesty of what happened in benghazi that i think it was very unprofessional and very undemocratic how the republican party tried to paint it is a very dangerous thing. some people do not want to have a military state in terms of how they run the embassies. it's very unfortunate that it but that is how the international goes. sabotaging the voting rights act, sabotaging the affordable health care act, making it look like something that it is when it isn't, everyone should be able to have health care. i don't know how many people can remember, but there was a time when you could not he den
into mississippi, it was pretty horrible. it was not all blamed on sherman. it was the collapse of the cotton market. the english went to india, egypt for cotton the last few years of the blockade, it broke them. 6000 union soldiers elected to settle in new orleans. it was not all like "gone with the wind." it was coming back, but it was a different culture. it would not be agricultural. it would not have that until later in the 19th century. host: the north was in the midst of a great big industrial revolution. the days of the big financiers on wall street. tell us about what was happening there. guest: thanks in part to the machinery of war. guest: it was a continuation of the war and an expansion, and they were getting ready for the centennial of the nation and showing off the advances that had been made in the past 100 years. most of those were technological advances, the old farming equipment to the new modern technology, transcontinental railroad, transportation was bringing people closer together, making it much easier to get cross-country. host: here are a few of the big things that h
. louisiana, mississippi, what is happening in some of those states? >> that is an important point, one of the interesting demographic changes in america over the last 25 years. the expert we will hear from later. traditionally, immigrants have gone to the south, other than -- shunned the south, other than texas. that has been a problem. now, you are seeing dixie really attracting a lot of the immigrant states like north carolina. one of the states with the biggest percentage increase of immigration over the last 15 years has been georgia. it has become a high-growth state. people at, are immigrants more attracted to a state with high welfare benefits, or are they attracted to a state that has jobs? we look at some of the evidence, and what we found was, on balance, immigrants are much more likely to go to states with unemployment rates than they are to go to states with welfare. they are coming here because they want a job, not a welfare check. >> it makes logical sense. if you are to leave your country and make out somewhere new -- >> there are so many people on the other side of the
appendectomy at a hospital in jackson, mississippi. the 71-year-old is expected to make a full recovery. >>anna: 32 minutes after the hour. how do you stop government leaks? get rid of the humans. a new dramatic step that is just being announced by the n.s.a. director at its cyber security conference. the plan, replace computer system administrators with machines. >> what we are in the process of doing, but not fast enough, is reducing our system administrators by about 90% for the first reason, which was to make our networks more defensible and more secure. >>anna: this plan was apparently already in place before the leaks but is now being sped up. >>peter: overnight a wild police chase ends with a suspect's car crashing and flipping over. take a look with us. >> you're going to have to make a turn here. look at this. off to the dirt and through the fence and rolling. >>peter: it happened in california. the man behind the wheel accused of carjacking that kia van. after about 20 minutes he finally got out of the car with a few bumps and bruises and then surrendered to police. any choice? i don'
, your thoughts on the president's remarks yesterday. west mississippi, independent line. caller: i completely agree with the president. mr. snowden is not a patriot. one of the most important thing is facing our country now is this whole issue of fiber security. fibrous security is more important to our nation than the budget deficit problem. it is more important than our dependence on foreign oil. we have to be more aggressive with our cyber security protection. when have to be more aggressive with regard to battling against these groups who want to break into our cyber systems that control everything from our financial markets to our power grids and everything else. houston,ther troy from texas. republican line. caller: thank you for taking my call. i think he is a patriot. the government cannot listen to every phone call and every conversation we have. that information is our private property. we should be able to sell it as we see fit. cyber security is no excuse for setting up being cut or a police state. this is a country and it seems like he is a patriot to me. host: suzanne
of the mississippi, 800 square miles right here in the middle of california. these cotton growers from the south were chased out by the bull weasel, came last and they claim this land, this blakely and. they took the rivers and dams them and shoved to the flow to places where they wanted to go cotton. at some point they had to go find labor. a number of folks came to the basin and their nerd is played out here. quite okies, bitchiness and black okies. no one had ever written about lack okies. they came in the 40s when this cotton picker was started in the fields. it could take the middle swath of the fields in the 40s and 50s, but it could not take the edge of the rows. so the black okies were working across the machine that would eventually idle them, picking the edges of the cotton and in 10 years time they were idled. the women ended up becoming mates and housekeepers for wealthy white farmers, much like the south. and the men, where they occurred, found work. many of them were idled. the children left this place. when we came upon it, it was mostly old folks. when i wrote my last book, west of th
collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as i said, that day, a bridge just shouldn't fall down in the middle of america. not an eight-lane bridge in the middle of rush hour and not a bridge six blocks from my house. that's what happened. people were killed. hundreds were injured. you know what we do when it does break down, when that happens in america? we rebuild. we rebuilt that bridge less than months. we rebuilt like they're rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild because that's what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure and it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and our locks and our dams. so where do you think the senate passed bipartisan water bill, the water resources development act. where do you think it is? it's is it you can in the house of representatives another example. after decades of immigrants living in the shadows, kids who lived in our military denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied industry. the senate passed a bipartisan
in mississippi a couple of miles from the state penitentiary, they have a program that allows prisoners to leave and make $6 per hour processing chickens. they said they have never had a prisoner last more than two days cleaning chickens. that they would rather be in their cells in prison than work in the chicken processing plant because it is such hard, dirty, nasty work. we are seeing the same thing in arizona. picking lettuce, there are no american workers lining up to do those jobs. host of this tweet -- -- host: this tweet -- guest: if there were? oh, well, a secret about immigration, if you wanted to come to the united states and clean a hotel room or work in a service sector that is not agriculture, there is no way for you to come to this country to work. there is especially no way for you to stay. we do not have a visa category that addresses these people. while we do have an agriculture program, it is small and difficult to use and many employers do not use it. in california they say that 70% of agriculture workers are here illegally and only 4% of the total population are using the h2a
.s. in the military yesterday. mississippi, democratic caller. your message to congress? take healtheed to care way from congress. they are making $70 per hour and they will not even raise the minimum wage. most of america are too stupid to realize they're voting against their own interests by not voting health care for themselves. have a nice day. host: sue, your message to congress? caller: i want to be at your health care plan, congress. host: what do you think should be done about the health care law? host: if they vote it in for us, they should be under the same health care. host: do you think should be defunded? caller: yes, i do. host: have you send that message to a member of congress? caller: i have not. host of the to attend a town hall meeting? caller: yes, i have. --t: who is did you go to whose did you go to? caller: ron paul. host: when was that? m, when he was running last time? host: thank you. next caller. caller tell my message to them is -- caller: my message to them is that obama care is coming in with -- medicare was here before obama care. if we take money at of this out of th
is the critical year. realignment wouldn't have happened if not for the 1930s -- >> -- got 87% in mississippi -- >> and eisenhower got a stronger share of the southern vote. >> we could talk about it off camera. listen, "the national review" cover story, "why like ike." thank you very much. cokie, thank you, have a great weekend. tomorrow, david axelrod will be here on set and we'll talk to reverend al sharpton and martin luther king iii ahead of the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. ahead this morning, the official director of the consumer financial protection bureau. it's official, richard cordray in his first television interview since his confirmation. the incredible 911 call from that school shooting outside of atlanta. how a level headed school employee may have single-handedly prevented tragedy. when we come back. the secret is out. hydration is in. [ female announcer ] only aveeno daily moisturizing lotion has an active naturals oat formula that creates a moisture reserve so skin can replenish itself. aveeno® naturally beautiful results. >>> good morning, everybody. 8:00 a
the storm troopers of the movement. they went into the mississippi delta, where other organizations were afraid to go. and out of the mississippi delta, a sharecropping family. by her own account, went to school only one date in her entire life. i would argue she was one of the most eloquent spokespersons for the aims of the movement. the speech that she gave the democratic national convention in 1964, you can youtube it. if you have not heard it, hear it. it is one of the most eloquent statements i've heard. a courageous woman. but again, if we move from the national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of the most exciting things about being involved in the scholarly production of the civil rights movement, we have a lot of really good stuff that is coming up that is talking about these local activists who are anonymous for the most part with a national movement. and if we go back to where we are today clearly, we are at a place where we have to think of very local terms the action is going to be at the state level. living in kansas, i would argue kansas is a laborat
that we have a lot of partners there joining us. host: brookhaven, mississippi. republican. caller: i don't like what y'all are doing on this. you are showing pictures and everything and how to do all kinds of things. i do not think you all should be doing this. i wish y'all would please stop showing this on tv. terrorists watch tv. i am highly upset. host: go ahead. guest: maybe i can give you come for. this is at a 30,000 foot level. there are much more details that go into it than what i can even describe your today. rest assured that there is a great deal of security in and around the ports and ports around the country. the federal government is doing a good job. host: all the information is public information? guest: it is. host: at what point does the government come into play? what it is here, who takes over security? host: security is a joint venturer. when it is under water it is mainly coast guard. when it reaches the earth it is port authority and customs. reporting scanning and certain containers that open it, it is federally managed. the state portion as to make sure they are
above mississippi. >>> and apple co-founder steve wozniak offering his review of "jobs" with ashton kutchers ahis former partner. steve likes ashton better in "that '70s show" let's just say. >>> futures lower after the longest losing streak since december for stocks. the dow down for four consecutive trading days losing 440 points. >>> the irs sent out letters to 20,000 small business owners over the past year notifying them of possible income underreporting. the irs thinks businesses that get most of their sales through credit cards may be underreporting their cash transactions. cnn money has a list of places where homes are the most affordable and your income goes the farthest. top, altemon springs, florida. >> we norman hat tan. we had red flag warnings in the area, talking about strong winds and dry lightning, eventually we'll get more moisture and see rain hit the ground and that will bring relief toward the second half of the week but it will take some time. >>> rain, way too much of it, in the southeast, one to two inches of rain still possible, three to four inches possible
processing plant in mississippi a couple of miles from the state penitentiary, they have a program that allows prisoners to leave and make $6 per hour processing chickens. they said they have never had a prisoner last more than two days cleaning chickens. that they would rather be in their cells in prison than work in the chicken processing plant because it is such hard, dirty, nasty work. we are seeing the same thing in arizona. picking lettuce, there are no american workers lining up to do those jobs. host: a couple more tweets -- guest: if there were? oh, well, a dirtly littlesecret about immigration, if you wanted to come to the united states and clean a hotel room or work in a service sector that is not agriculture, there is no way for you to come to this country to work. there is especially no way for you to stay. we do not have a visa category that addresses these people. while we do have an agriculture program, it is small and difficult to use and many employers do not use it. in california they say that 70% of agriculture workers are here illegally and only 4% of the total
a barge down the mississippi, tanker cars, or trucks. >> there's a story that was first report bid the hill newspaper saying that the e he on would likely be uld -- >> that's actedly not a new storyifment that came out a couple years ago and was investigated. and my understanding is there were no conflicts found. what you're starting to see is a recycling of a lot of events. keep in mind that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite cross-border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this is now taking longer again, we could have built the empire state building five times by now, we completed world war ii in less time. so at some point you start to say, we've had four studies. we've had this, we've had that. at some point the question is has this policy really been high jacked or are we still on path? > eric from our democrat's line. >> we have environmental studies. we've also had practical xperience with spills. i don't know where o you're getting your safety record from, the 99.999%. if one of these pipelin
. where are you from, columbus, where? >> mississippi. >> is that your sister? is she cool. >> okay. look at this next segment. i'm going to show you cool stuff for school. getting ready to go back to school. some kids are back in class. do they have everything they need and want, must haves. amy goodman is here. amy good woman is what i should say. >> i love that. pleasure to be here. >> they want cool stuff but don't break our bank account. >> the latest and greatest. there are a lot of wonderful sales this weekend as well. starting off with the super neat backpacks. this is actually for a younger set, preschoolers or kindergartners. because it has a case inside the backpack which makes the kid a superhero. i call this super fly. my toddler darting out the door in the morning, takes him forever. now he's going to fly. >> that's cool. >> seven different signs. great for boys and girls. >> just under $40. >> where can you get them? >> super me hero.com website. >> you like them? i like them. >> people still use lunchboxes. >> everything vintage is new again. this is from our era. annivers
can do how can we serve and then power them. in 1963 in jackson, mississippi, angry protesters and armed police prevented any massacre after the murder of edgar evans. that was a kind of lawyer and later that he was. years later he gave me his photo with a description from tennyson's eula says. .. and particularly the american bar association. thank you all very much. [applause] hillary clinton wrapping up her remarkings in san francisco. we are going to take you live with the national prez club and a discussion underway a minute ago on the role of government affairs officers and whether they help or hinder government transparency. live coverage on c-span2. >> the panelist presentations will be available on paoand reporters pao in public affairs officers and a and d reporters at blog spot. com. as a reporter i should disclose that i'm biased in favor of as much openness and disclosure as possible and as few rules as possible about who can talk to reporters in the federal government, and how. but i also recognize and i really mean this. the public affairs has an indispensable j
. this is in mississippi. the incredible architecture led the recovery effort, and what he did was didn't say we're rebuilding your community, but we're coming in to rebuild with your community, and that rebuilding center is now an economic development center. is us in a nutshell; right? this is when people ask what do architects do? this is us. the reality is that it's value. i'm going to go through a bunch of projects quickly to talk value. what value do we bring? the value of safety, anyone in a tough neighborhood understands what safety and security and security brings. here we are. the roughest neighborhood in south africa with the highest instance of violence murder, rapes, and violence crime. ddpu, rather than saying, hey, we want to do a do-good project, but -- put it by the highways. there's a tactical approach of urban planning, seeing where the areas were, and that's where we go, doing urban a.q. puncture -- acupuncture. we ended up in a park that has -- basically a park where women were raped, murdered, and dumped for decades, and it was across the street from the school. that's one
of 2007, when in the middle of a summer's day, that bridge collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as they said that day, a bridge should not just fall down in the middle of america. not an eight lane bridge in the middle of rush hour, and not a bridge that is six blocks from my house. people were killed. hundreds of people injured. do you know what we do when it does break down, when something like that happens in america? we rebuild. lessbuilt that bridge in than 13 months. we rebuild just like they are rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild just like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild, because that is what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure. it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and are -- our dams. [applause] senatee do you think the passed the bipartisan waterville, what are develop and act -- water bill, water development act? in ourve served military, denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied entry. the senate finally passed a bipartisan, comprehensive immigration bill w
the burden on the women. i've been out, we went out one time to mississippi. and we were there. and then we went up to birmingham, alabama. we were there. we heard the same story time and time again. a woman is being abused. the neighbor, woman, calls up and guess who goes to jail? the person who called in the abuse. command simply turns around and says that woman doesn't have papers. what this law enforcement do? that's why you have to separate law enforcement from immigration policy. the police is there to protect the people. [applause] and they have to protect the women and the family. i mean, it's fine intended to talk about safety, but we have to understand just how safety really has a corrosive effect. the police, their cars are important to them, protect them. their guns are important to them to protect us. they are communication, their training is important. but the most important tool, instrument that the police have, is the people and the cooperation of the people. and when you pass immigration law, they criminalize all immigrants and make them fear the police, you make all of us
is katrina, read the, gustav, ike, the mississippi oil spill, recently tropical storm isaac. some of the concerns we have is how can we evacuate have the coast line in a 38 hour period i know who to go to and how long it is going to take. how many will be evacuated or not, how many can help themselves, how many will be the state's assistance, how many of those will need federal assistance? i can tell you. and even less night. all of a sudden i found myself not coming up with words and anxious about what i would say to u.s. policy makers and by fire that we are asking for your help to advocate for the dollars to be returned because of the things that i know, in terms of operations. and i can tell you just from the american red cross has a 23 sq. feet per person that wouldn't come up with capacity numbers for rebuilding that has been increasing as recommendations are made through groups such as yourself. we should have various things for children so that capacity is now increasing to about 52 square foot per person. what does that mean in terms of operations? that means the number o
california or new york but louisiana, mississippi. >> that is the important point the interesting immigration graphic you would hear from the experts later but traditionally immigrants have shunned the south of man has been a problem that now use the dixie's like north carolina wednesday with the biggest percentage increase is georgia. that has become the high-growth state to the point where people ask our immigrants more attracted to a state with high welfare benefits or to the state that has jobs? what we have found is on balance democrats are more likely to go to low unemployment rates than with high welfare benefits which is the important timing because people are coming here because they want a job the. >> and it does make sense if you leave your country. >> it does make sense but there is so many people on the other side of this issue that the immigrants come here for welfare. some do but the vast majority do not. >> a very important point. >> so now with the international experts the author of a chapter of the bush institutes solutions looking at growth and immigration and evidence she
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